Category: Engender (page 1 of 20)

Women managers work for free nearly 2 hours every day

Women managers effectively work for 2 hours every day for free.

Women in equivalent full-time jobs earn 22% less than men.  This is equal to 1h 40m a day or 57 days each year. These are findings from the annual survey of 72,000 UK managers published by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI).

For men and women of all ages in all professional roles the gender pay gap now stands at £8,524, with men earning on average f £39,136 and women only £30,612. In 2014, or a  pay gap of £9,069, or 23%.

The survey reveals the pay gap becomes wider as women grow older. Women aged 26-35 are paid 6% less than their male colleagues, rising to 20% for women aged 36-45. The gap increases to 35% for women aged 46-60, just like working  for 681 hours for free compared to male colleagues.

For women and men in their 60s the pay gap expands to 38% – so much for the success of equality initiatives and the lack of political drive to ensure a more equal society.

Tribute to pioneer in public health and patient safety!

EIWH pays tribute to pioneer in public health and patient safety.

17 August 2015 – Last week, Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey, the FDA regulator and worldwide pioneer in medicines safety and the protection of patients, died at the age of 101. As a young scientific officer, freshly employed by the FDA, she stubbornly questioned the evidence of the safety data submitted for the market authorization of Thalidomide.  The drug became notorious for causing birth defects when taken by pregnant women against morning sickness.

Frances Kelsey’s persistence to refuse authorization in light of fierce pressure from the manufacturer of Thalidomide, spared American women from experiencing the series of tragic birth defects and death the drug had caused in Europe where the medicine was available.

She also changed regulatory history: following the Thalidomide disaster, the US government revised the regulation of pharmaceutical products. Medicines approval is now based on the criteria of quality; safety and efficacy, which is still the gold standard, used today by the FDA and here in Europe by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and national medicines agencies.

From the scientific, societal and women’s health perspective this was an enormous achievement for a young female scientist in the 1960s and we can only hope for another pioneer like Frances who will take us to the next rigorous step of patient protection.

Even today we are faced with a situation where approval data is not always robust for women and older people since, for safety reasons, they are still all too often excluded from clinical trials, yet these population groups are the heaviest medicine takers. In addition, it is estimated that currently around 80% of pregnant women take medicines during pregnancy often due to already existing chronic conditions.

As more and more women postpone pregnancy until later years, this will become a societal concern that needs urgently addressing”,

said Peggy Maguire, EIWH Director General.

A step forward will be provided by the new EU Clinical Trial Regulation, which came into effect in May 2016.  This new legislation will require population group analysis according to gender and age. The number of men and women included in the trial will have to be made more transparent, while strict protective measures to include pregnant and lactating women in clinical trials will be required.

Our recent EUGenMed Roadmap conference, which examined sex and gender in pharmaceutical regulation, recommended that Europe improve rigorous sex- and age-specific pharmacovigilance reporting for existing products.  In order to address the current knowledge gap, a regulatory framework should be developed for safe use of medicines during pregnancy, which should include post-marketing data collection and common rules for pregnancy exposure registries,“

concluded Hildrun Sundseth, EIWH President.

For more information:

eu: Sex and gender in bio medicine and health research

eugenmed_new

Roadmap for implementation of sex and gender into biomedicine and health research in Europe

The overall objective of EUGenMed is to improve the health of European citizens, women and men, by improving biomedical and health research through a sex and gender (S&G) sensitive approach. For this purpose we will develop a Roadmap to implement sex and gender into European biomedicine and health research. The Roadmap is the main output of the EUGenMed Project.

Definition – the Roadmap

The Roadmap includes all steps of the EUGenMed project, all materials that were discussed and generated during the project in a true spirit of openness, transparency and inclusiveness and a number of suggested implementation steps that shall take place after finishing the project. The core element of the Roadmap is a comprehensive document that summarizes the findings of four workshops in a precise and coherent manner with a number of appendixes in different formats (flyers, ppt sets), as well as recommendations for implementation of sex and gender aspects in bio medicine and health research for different target audiences.

The Roadmap was developed in four workshops, in specific areas that were chosen in a complementary manner to cover important fields in bio medicine and health research: clinical medicine and pharmacology, public health and prevention, basic research, medicines regulation and medical education.

The workshop (WS) themes were developed in such a way as to support each other. However, WS documents will be written so that they can be used and understood on their own. They will be made available to the target groups/stakeholders soon after the conference. The entire Roadmap with supporting materials will be published at the EUGenMed website

health research in Europe

Overview on the EUGenMed steps leading to the elements of roadmap:

Assembly of Stakeholders and Target audiences, communication structure, networks

Stakeholders in Gender Medicine or target audiences for our measures have been assembled by systematic searches and a large number of them has been involved in the kick-off conference and the four workshops: medical doctors and (bio) medical societies, researchers, teachers and students in academia, industry, pharmaceutical companies, science funding organizations, regulatory bodies, health policy makers, patient organisations, representatives of civil society and lay people.

Developing a road map strategy at the kick-off conference:

At the kick-off meeting we agreed a strategy with definition of focal areas of work, materials to be generated and target audiences. We defined our main working fields: clinical medicine and pharmacology, public health and prevention, basic biomedical research, medicines regulations and medical education and organized workshops in these fields.

Generation of Road map materials in four workshops (see appendix)

The generation of roadmap materials, timelines and measures for implementation of sex and gender aspects in biomedicine and health research for different target audiences took place in four workshops. We choose cardiovascular diseases (CVD) as a topic for an overarching case study and it was therefore covered in all four workshops. As a result, publications will include differences in clinical CVD and in its treatment (WS 1), in its risk factors (WS 2), its pathophysiological bases (WS 3), in medicines regulations and in medical school teaching (WS 4). The WS outputs, available from our home page in form of reports, slide sets and policy briefs, will be presented and discussed at the final conference (see appendix) and will be published as papers.

Goals of the final conference

The final EUGenMed conference will present the Roadmap and its different steps to the stakeholders, present the workshop findings and recommendations and discuss how we can all work together and with wider stakeholder groups to realize the EUGenMed goals after the project has finished.

Engagement of stakeholders

We will engage stakeholders in the process of further communication and dissemination of results to reach our objectives agreed at the Kick-off conference. All stakeholders will be encouraged to take the recommendations forward in their field of action.

Structures for sustainability

The project outline of EUGenMed asked for creating structures that will allow for sustainability of the project after the end of funding. We shall set up a working group that has the potential to generate new funding opportunities and continue to realize the recommendations of the roadmap. In the initial project we envisaged a European Gender Medicine Network, as the successor of EUGenMed. We will propose a structure to continue the EUGenMed work and involve an even wider groups of stakeholders.

Future steps towards implementation

Continuation of group meetings and meetings with wider stakeholders in structures to be defined and ensure further publications, updated information and dissemination of papers, policy briefs, fact sheets. Providing free access to materials for dissemination and communication of gender aspects to others, including slide sets via homepage.

Inclusion of gender knowledge into medical teaching in as many institutions as possible by providing learning materials/modules for this purpose. Cooperation with industry to include research for sex differences into their research and development. Discussion with funding agencies to include sex and gender into their research calls. Discussion with European agencies and institutions to include sex and gender into their guidelines and programs.

Appendix: Main workshop results

 

WS 1: Sex and gender in clinical medicine and pharmacology
Strategy

The EUGenMed WS 1.1 workshop group assembled 20 experts that have made significant contributions to the field of clinical gender medicine. They were identified in our kick-off conference and selected based on their previous contributions in the field and in order to cover a broad spectrum of topics of work and nationalities. The group acknowledged in intense discussions that in many diseases well-described differences in etiologies and clinical presentation exist between women and men. However, this knowledge is dispersed and incompletely translated into clinical practice and research programs. The highest density of evidence based knowledge is available for cardiovascular diseases(CVD). The EUGenMed WS 1.1 groups therefore decided to focus first on CVD and to summarize the gender related findings from the other disciplines under a different aspect.

Results

We briefly summarized our major findings related to CVD: Ischemic heart disease in the presence of non obstructed epicardial coronary arteries is more common in women than in men. Diagnostic algorithms for coronary artery disease (CAD) that perform well in men are less suitable for low and median risk middle aged women. Tako tsubo syndrome and spontaneous coronary artery dissection endanger predominantly women and may be related to hormonal changes. Remodelling in myocardial hypertrophy and HF differs in women and men, with more concentric hypertrophy and less fibrosis in women. Women have unique biological life events, menopause, pregnancy, breastfeeding which may alter their risk of CVD and response to therapies.

Sex differences in pharmacology is a major issue. Sex differences in pharmacokinetics determine bio availability of CV drugs. Sex differences in pharmacodynamics may be based, among other factors, on sex specific ion channel expression and regulation. Even so a number of differences are well known they are incompletely integrated into drug development and testing.
The group contributed to five policy briefs that are coordinated by the European Institute of Women’s Health (EIWH). We suggested inclusion of some the facts listed above for CVD in a more general manner, e.g. stroke occurs more frequently and with a different pathophysiology in women, diabetes is a more severe risk factor for CVD in women than in men, that asthma and lung cancer have different risk factors and manifestations in women and men.
In conclusion, we provided evidence that a more stringent consideration of S&G differences in CVD will lead to better understanding of pathophysiology and more personalized therapeutic approaches. We provide data suggesting that gender specific mechanisms play a role in many other diseases than CVD and just need more gender sensitive analysis.

Workshop outcomes and further steps towards implementation

 

The participants recognized the necessity to communicate their knowledge to a broader scientific community, to present findings at congresses, to publish summaries, to present knowledge to medical societies and be included in their guidelines and to include knowledge to medical students and health care professionals in a structured manner. As a consequence, they decided to publish 2 papers and to contribute to the eGender learningprogramme that is built for medical students and HC professionals. Sessions were submitted and accepted for the ESC congress London 2015. Furthermore, cardiovascular disease was integrated into the IGM congress September 2015 in Berlin. Next steps may be submission of sessions to OSSD congress 2016 and ESC 2016.

  • Publication: Gender in CVD, V. Regitz-Zagrosek et al, submitted
  • Publication: Transdisciplinary criteria for the inclusion of sex and gender into diagnostic algorithms, Oertelt Prigione et al, in preparation
  • Contributions to ESC meeting 2015 London; 3 sessions with gender topics in clinical field
  • Planning sessions at congress of the International Society for Gender Medicine in Berlin, Sept 2015 (www.igmcongress.com/ )
  • Submitting sessions with cardiovascular gender topics for OSSD 2016, DGK 2016, ESC 2016
  • Contributions to 5 policy briefs on CVD, Stroke, Diabetes, Asthma and Lung Cancer

WS 2: Sex and gender in public health and prevention

Strategy

In accordance with the general structure of the project, WS 2 was also designed to include the largest possible number of stakeholders in the field. This appears most significant for the field of public health, which includes practitioners from diverse backgrounds, and fields of activity. Hence, a significant additional effort was made to identify and invite experts beyond the participants of the kick-off conference. The WS included 22 participants covering all stakeholder areas (researchers, policy-makers, politicians, advocacy groups, funding bodies, WHO and European Commission representatives, media and communication actors).

The workshop was then structured into two main blocks, one on knowledge, where available but frequently unstructured information was to be assembled and one on implementation, where diverse experiences and expectations were summarized and analyzed to produce a systematic catalogue of practical steps for the use in different public health domains. Furthermore, the process of generating this knowledge and ‘doing gender medicine’ was also analyzed, paying particular attention to the ways in which sex and gender are redefined in this process.

Results

Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular diseases (CVD), cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes, are a major global health concern and the leading cause of premature death (more than 40% of them occurring before the age of 70 years) and disease burden, both worldwide and in Europe.

Modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and alcohol use contribute to the majority of NCDs. Adopting an integrative approach to health and a broad understanding of risk factors, we chose to not only focus on these modifiable risk factors, but also on mental health due to its strong relations with NCDs, on obesity insofar as it is both a condition and a risk factor, and on work which is both a protective and a risk factor. Addressing highly prevalent and relevant NCD risk factors is a significant public health and primary prevention topic, relevant for a large range of conditions. Gender-sensitive interventions are likely to contribute to an increased efficiency of interventions.
For women and men, most NCD risk factors show distinct associations with NCDs, such as with CVD, and population attributable risks differ considerably for men and women. Furthermore, from a life course perspective, first manifestations of cardiovascular diseases differ in men and women, with men being more likely to develop coronary heart disease as a first event, while women are more likely to have cerebrovascular disease or heart failure as their first event, which may be explained partly by a different lifetime pattern of risk factors.

Risk factors have to be conceptualised as influenced by factors intersecting with sex and gender, relating them to culturally driven gender norms, socio-economic position, behavioural factors, genetic make-up, levels of susceptibility, exposure time to risk factors, differences in knowledge and risk perceptions, access to health care and health care seeking patterns, health systems responses (control and management).
Major publications, even when displaying detailed sex-specific data, do not address sex and gender aspects, and there is a paucity of sex- and gender-specific recommendations for prevention. Likewise, although a number of gender sensitive Public Health Policies have been developed and implemented in the last two decades (WHO, 2012; UN General Assembly, 1997), research on impact and efficiency of such approaches and on risk factor control and management is very scarce and there is a lack of critical discussion on methodology of gender sensitised interventions.

The workshop brought together the best evidence concerning sex and gender aspects of NCD risk factors, identified examples of effective interventions, pointed out current research gaps and formulated steps for implementation in public health practice that will be discussed with stakeholders.

Workshop outcomes and further steps towards implementation

Within the WSs the need for differentiated approaches to implementation was emphasized and all stakeholders agreed upon the need for a concerted systemic and multi level approach.

Significant current hurdles are represented by an insufficient coordination between research, politics and organizations hampering concerted actions on well-defined priorities within the field of sex and gender research and practice. Based on written and oral feedback from all involved stakeholders, structured steps for the implementation at different process levels are being assembled in order to initiate, advance or finalize the implementation of gender sensitive policy and practice in public health.

  • Publication: Sex and gender aspects of risk factors for non-communicable diseases across Europe, V. Elisabeth Zemp-Stutz, Ineke Klinge et al, in preparation
  • Publication: Doing gender medicine: Reflections on sex and gender in medicine and public health, Lucie Dalibert, in preparation
  • Publication: Implementation steps towards gender-sensitive policy and practice, Sabine Oertelt Prigione, in preparation
  • Planning sessions at congress of the International Society for Gender Medicine in Berlin, Sept 2015 (www.igmcongress.com/)
  • Submitting abstracts to Gender Summit 2015, EUPHA 2016 and EASST 2016.

 

WS 3: Sex differences in basic research

 

Strategy

The EUGenMed WS 1.3 workshop group assembled 20 experts that have made significant contributions to the field of sex differences in basic research and were identified in our kick-off conference, with the aim to assure of broad coverage of different topics and views from different European nations. The group acknowledged in intense discussions that in a large number of animal models and most cell culture systems, significant differences exist between male and female cells and animals.
However, this knowledge is dispersed and incompletely translated into research programs and methodological difficulties hamper the progress. The group decided to develop concepts at 3 levels: improvement of knowledge, in methodology, and networking.

Results

With the consideration of sex differences in cells, tissues and organs basic research has reached an exciting new dimension. The individual clinical care of patients can only be as good as the knowledge brought up by basic research approaches which deal consciously with sex differences at genetic and molecular levels. Both the differences between the sexes and the alterations that arise with age are of great importance for a society with increasing life expectancy. On the other hand, determinants affecting the unborn child are of particular importance for basic researchers. An enormous number of questions regarding sex differences remain unanswered. Two main research questions are central: The first is about the contributions of sex chromosomes and sex hormones on sex differences in cellular function and the second deals with periods of susceptibility for cardiovascular risk factors.

Basic research feeds directly into drug development. CV drug development is getting more and more difficult and costly. We need new approaches to replace the “one size fits all” model by targeted, sex specific approaches that will lead to an improved and S&G sensitive understanding.

  • The WS discussed possible underlying mechanisms like the interaction between sex chromosomes and sex hormones with respect to sex differences in gene regulation depending on genetic variants and epigenetic processes. Examples for translational approaches were mentioned like the development of anti-arrhythmic drugs based on proteomic results concerning sex differences of ion channel expression leading to arrhythmias. Furthermore participants made reference to the progress in developing modified estrogen receptor drugs (SERMs) and the sex specific effects of PDE 5 inhibitors.
  • The discussants agreed that methodology is a major issue. They discussed the use of primary cells and cell lines of both sexes for in vitro experiments, use of animals of both sexes in disease models, transgene- or knock-out animal models genetically unique to sex, use the four core genotype (FCG) mice to provide insights into the action of sex chromosomes and perform micro array sequencing, RNA sequencing and
    GWAS with respect to both sexes.
  • The group discussed basic research aspects that could play a role in CVD, stroke, diabetes and lung cancer and contributed them as open needs for further research to the policy briefs.

Workshop outcomes and further steps towards implementation

  1. The participants recognized the necessity to communicate their knowledge to a broader scientific community, to present findings at congresses, to publish summaries and to enter knowledge into guidelines. The vision is to act together with the International Society of Gender Medicine (IGM), the Canadian Heart Research Centre (CHRC) and the American Organization for the Study of Sex Differences (OSSD). S&G
    should be integrated in basic research projects, as in RADOX. The group decided to publish a review paper S&G specific data and methods in basic research. In the preparatory phase, sessions were submitted to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress and 1 session with gender specific basic research topics will be held at ESC in London. Furthermore, sex differences in basic research were integrated into the IGM
    congress September 2015 in Berlin. Next steps may be submission of sessions to OSSD congress 2016 and the basic research congresses of ESC 2016 and AHA (BCVS).
  2. Publication: Gender in Basic research, V Regitz-Zagrosek et al in preparation
  3. Contributions to ESC meeting 2015 London; a sessions with basic research gender topics
  4. Planning sessions at congress of the International Society for Gender Medicine in Berlin, Sept 2015 (www.igmcongress.com/ ): epigenetic mechanisms in sex differences, sex differences in cells,
  5. Submitting sessions with basic research topics for OSSD 2016, IGM 2017
  6. Contributions to 5 policy briefs on CVD, Stroke, Diabetes, Asthma and lung cancer
WS 4a: Medical Education
Strategy
  1. The EUGenMed workshop 4a and 4b brought together over 40 experts from a broad range of stakeholders:
  2. Representatives from the regulatory body, the European Medicines Agency; national Ethics committees; European Good Clinical Practice organisation; Commission officials; healthcare professionals in various disciplines from the European and national level; patient organisations, academics and researchers in education and communication; and the pharmaceutical industry.
Results
  1. The Workshop 4a acknowledged that over the last 10 years the importance of sex and gender in medical research and treatment of medical conditions has been increasingly recognised. However, the need for integration of this knowledge into medical education curriculum still remains a challenge. Acknowledging the impact of sex and gender differences, increases the quality of health care provision. A patient-centred evidence-based sex and gender perspective is required throughout medical curricula including graduate programmes, medical programmes, nursing, rehabilitation, and pharmacy, continuing medical education and continuing nursing education across Europe.
  1. Cardiovascular disease (CVD): Traditionally regarded as a male disease, CVD is the number one killer of women worldwide. The risk of CVD in women is still often underestimated in the medical community and in women themselves. Incorporating information generated from the growing discipline of sex and gender based medicine in educational and training programmes improves access to high quality health care and
    thereby will improve patient outcomes.
  1. The regulation of medical education in Europe is the responsibility of individual Member States not the European Union (EU). The European Commission has passed legislation relevant to the medical community, such as the mutual recognition of professional qualifications, and is participating in a number of efforts to synchronize the education systems across Europe. However, detailed regulation as well as the assessment
    and evaluation of curricula remains the remit of individual Member States which has its own set of standards and regulations for medical education.
  1. There is no direct mandate to coordinate medical education at an EU-level. However, most Member States collaborate in the Bologna Process and are bound by EU Directive 2005/36/EC to provide some form of regulation. The inclusion of vocabulary such as “socio-economic realities” and the “social surrounding of the human beings” in EU Directive 2005/36/EC highlights an existing awareness to combine the clinical component of medical education with social and cultural questions. Sex and gender and diversity awareness must be included in the dialogue.
  1. There are different approaches to integrate sex and gender into medical education: single courses (sometimes electives) or integrated (mainstreaming throughout the curriculum) or both. Sex, gender and diversity must be included in final objectives of programmes, as part of accreditation, in quality criteria and considered by visitation committees. Consequently a multilevel approach is needed and experts must work with each other.
  1. In the final Roadmap conference we will discuss with key stakeholders how best to integrate sex and gender into medical and health professional curricula. Recommendations from the workshop on medical education will be presented for discussion and agreement at the final EUGenMed conference.
Suggested next Steps
  1. Develop a policy paper on sex and gender in medical education. Generate accessible and inclusive publications.
  2. Set up a European stakeholder group on sex and gender in medical education.
  3. Educate teachers on the importance of integrating sex and gender into medical education.  Encourage interactive education.
  4. Work with students to integrate sex and gender in medical education, improving medical education. Adjust curricula to improve content, focusing on well-being.
  5. Improve communication of the importance of sex and gender in medical education, expanding to a wide audience. Develop a clear definition of “medical education.”
  6. Promote the diffusion of best practice of integrating sex and gender into medical education using evidence to improve patient outcomes.
  7. Hold a symposium on sex and gender in medical education
WS 4 b: Medicines Regulation

This Workshop discussed how to translate the scientific evidence from sex and gender research into regulatory practice. Information collected from experts in the different EUGenMed workshops suggests that translating the evidence from Sex and Gender research into regulatory practice will lead to more effective, safe and targeted medicines for all.

The Workshop identified gaps in robust analysis and available information how medicines work in women. There is a lack of data from the current medicines approval process on 50% of the population – women.  Ever since the Thalidomide tragedy in the late 1950, there has been a reluctance to include women in clinical trials. The male body has been the norm. According to Health Canada

 

The general assumption prevailed that women did not differ from men except where their reproductive organs were concerned and data obtained from clinical research involving men could simply be extrapolated to women.”

Medicines are safer and more effective for everyone when clinical research includes diverse population groups of all ages. Even today, women are underrepresented in many clinical trials and if included, robust analysis is often lacking, a prime example is CVD.

It is also known that women metabolize medicines differently; a recent concrete example is the sleeping pill Ambien. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) halved the dose for women, after the drug had been on the market for 20 years.

The new EU Clinical Trials Regulation No 536/2015 is a major step forward as it has amended the legal conditions under which clinical trials will have to be conducted in the future. As of its implementation date May 2016, the population groups for whom the medicines are intended must be included in the trial and, if certain groups have been excluded this must be justified.

Workshop outcomes and further steps towards implementation:

 

In the final Roadmap conference we will discuss with EMA representatives and other key stakeholders how to improve sex and gender analysis when the Agency implements the new Clinical Trials Regulation and will make this information publicly available on the EU Portal and Clinical Trial database.

Suggested next steps
  • National Ethics committees to develop guidelines that require the inclusion of women in clinical research, utilising insights from the good practice example from the Medical University of Vienna.
  • IMI-2 initiative to bring together researchers, pharmaceutical industry, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and other key stakeholders to develop a robust methodology for subgroup analysis according to gender and age, addressing existing barriers to recruitment and retention of women and older people in clinical trials.
  • EMA together with key stakeholders to draft guidelines for the analysis of sex and gender differences in clinical trials (examples Health Canada, FDA guidelines).
  • EMA to follow FDA Snapshot initiative to make sex and age-specific data available and transparent
  • For already existing medicines improve rigorous sex- and age-specific pharmacovigilance reporting.
  • Request collection of post-marketing data for medicines use in pregnant women and develop common rules for pregnancy exposure registries.

 

eu: Eugenmed – Agenda for meeting 30th June 2015

eugenmed_new

EUGenMed Final conference

“Presentation of the Roadmap”

Tuesday, 30th June 2015, 8.15-16.30 at: The Permanent Representation of the 

Federal Republic of Germany to the European Union, Rue Jacques de Lalaing 8-14,

 1040 Brussels, Belgium.

Through the establishment of a European Gender Health Network and several thematic  workshops,the European Gender Medicine Project (EUGenMed) developeda roadmap for the implementation of sex and gender in biomedicine and health research.

We produced diverse instruments (position papers, policy briefs, review papers, implementation, recommendations, slides etc.) to aid the incorporation of sex and gender within the areas of medical research, health care and policy. Now, at our final conference, we will present these products and collectively define the road for future implementation.

Programme:

8.15-9.45 Registration and coffee, informal discussions with project leaders

9.45-10.00 Welcome by the official host The Permanent Representation of the 

Federal Republic of Germany to the European Union.

10.00-10.15 Welcome and representation of EUGenMed Project Partners

  • Charité: Vera Regitz-Zagrosek,
  • UM: Ineke Klinge,
  • EIWH: Peggy Maguire,

10.15-10.30 Overview on the EUGenMed Project goals – The roadmap  Vera Regitz-Zagrosek

10.30-11.45  Results from WS clinical medicine and pharmacology (1.1) and basic

research (1.3)

Chairs: Vera Regitz-Zagrosek/Angela Maas

  • Sex and gender issues in clinical cardiology Angela Maas, The Netherlands
  • Drug therapy Karin Schenck-Gustafsson, Sweden
  • Basic research Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, Germany 
  • Discussion with all stakeholders

11.45-12.45 Results from WS on public health and prevention (1.2)

Chairs: Ineke Klinge

  • Facts in public health Lucie Dalibert, The Netherlands
  • Implementation into public health practice and policy Sabine Oertelt-Prigione, Germany
  • Discussion with stakeholders

12.45-13.45 Lunch

13.45-14.30 Results from WS 1.4 –part a: medical education

Chair and introduction: Peggy Maguire

  • Medical education EIWH/ Petra Verdonk, The Netherlands
  • eGender learning at Charité Ute Seeland, Germany 
  • Discussion with stakeholders

14.30-15.15  Results from WS 1.4 – part b: Medicines regulation

Chairs and brief introduction: Hildrun Sundseth

  • Medicines regulation and gender aspects,the view of EMA: Thorsten Vetter, UK
  • Discussion with stakeholders

15.15-15.30 Coffee break

15.30-16.30 Round table: “Sustainability of a Gender sensitive roadmap for future health in  Europe”

Podium: Thorsten Vetter, Marek Glezerman, Katrín Fjeldsted, Ingrid Klingmann,

Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, Ineke Klinge, Hildrun Sundseth

Eugenmed Project sponsors

European Gender Medicine Project Final Conference

PRESS RELEASE

European Gender Medicine Project hosts final conference in Brussels 30 June 2015,

In a one day final conference hosted by the Permanent Representation of the Federal Republic of Germany to the European Union, the European Gender Medicine Project (EUGenMed) partners met with over eighty experts and stakeholders to discuss the future of Gender Medicine (GM) in the European Union (EU).  The aim of the EUGenMed Project is to improve the health of European citizens – both women and men – by improving biomedical and health research through a sex and gender (S&G) sensitive approach.

The final conference marked the end of the project activities to assemble the scientific evidence in a series of workshops under the DG Research and Innovation-funded Framework Seven Programme project held in 2014 and 2015.

At the final conference, the EUGenMed partners introduced the roadmap for implementation of S&G aspects into biomedicine and health research in Europe, which was developed in collaboration with a diverse group of experts over the last two years.

The Project presented its vision for the inclusion of S&G in biomedical and health research, medicines regulation and medical teaching by defining concrete steps for the translation of this vision into practice.

“We developed the Roadmap and project vision by working our way across the health care continuum—from the prevention of diseases to the early detection of symptoms, their  investigation, to the development of possible solutions and, finally, to their implementation in medicines regulation and medical practice.  Together with our stakeholders and experts, we have produced a portfolio of products, such as policy briefings, expert papers, guideline materials to best-practice reviews, slides and implementation grids, tailored for the various audiences in the health arena in order to aid the incorporation of sex and gender within the areas of medical research, health policy and care”
stated Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, Project Coordinator and Director of Institute for Gender in Medicine (GiM) at Charité Universitaetsmedizin Berlin.” 

 

 

The results from the four thematic Project workshops were explored by the conference delegates in an interactive discussion.

 

Over the last two years, the EUGenMed partners have worked closely with medical doctors, medical societies, academia, researchers, teachers and medical students, pharmaceutical companies, science funding organisations, regulatory bodies, health policy makers, patient organisations, representatives of civil society and lay people to assess the current state of sex and gender in biomedicine and health research and divise an effective plan to improve integration,”
explained Ineke Klinge, Associate Professor of Gender Medicine at Maastricht University and Visiting Professor at GiM at Charité Universitaetsmedizin Berlin

Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, Angela Maas and Karin Schenck-Gustafsson outlined the findings from the workshops discussing the incorporation of sex and gender in clinical studies, basic research
and drug therapy.

The results of the second workshop on public health and prevention were presented by Ineke Klinge, Lucie Dalibert, and Sabine Oertelt-Prigione.  Peggy Maguire, Director General of the European Institute of Women’s Health (EIWH) and President of European Public Health Alliance (EPHA), then reviewed the results from the workshop on medical education along with Petra Verdonk while Ute Seeland, explained a Charite developed elearning model.

Lastly, Hildrun Sundseth, EIWH President, summarised the findings from the workshop on sex and gender in medicines regulation with Thorsten Vetter presenting the views of the European
Medicines Agency.

The conference ended with a roundtable discussion on the sustainability of a gender sensitive roadmap for improving health for all in Europe.  Project partners and experts stressed the need to effectively disseminate the results in order to ensure the incorporation of sex and gender into future biomedical science and health research.

Peggy Maguire, Director General of the European Institute of Women’s Health and President of European Public Health Alliance, said,
Sex and gender strategies must be incorporated to the next generation of medical interventions and therapies.  Project findings will be disseminated in a targeted and customised fashion to key stakeholders at local, national and European level.  The introduction of sex and gender into research and medical practice and medical and health professional education and training will lead to significant innovations and has the potential to improve European citizens’ health.”

 

“We plan to set up a working group that has the potential to generate new funding opportunities and continues to realise the recommendations of the Roadmap. In the initial project, we envisaged a European Gender Medicine Network as the successor of EUGenMed,”     
announced Vera Regitz-Zagrosek.
We cannot afford to squander the opportunities created by this Project, so we must continue the EUGenMed work and momentum by involving an even wider group of stakeholders in the future,”
added Hildrun Sundseth, President of the European Institute of Women’s Health.

Recognise and resist sexual aggression

An intensive program for female college students on recognising and resisting sexual aggression reduced the chances of being raped over a year period by nearly half, according to new research.
A study in the New England Journal of Medicine, compared effects of attending a four-session course in resisting sexual assault to a more typical university approach of providing brochures on sexual assault.

The program is one of the first to demonstrate success in a controlled trial — and among the first to be published by the medical journal, best-known as a forum for clinical drug trials.

The study comes only weeks before colleges and universities across the United States are required to detail how they will deal with sexual assault. Those reports, due to the U.S. Department of Education on July 1, are mandated by the 2013 Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act.

1 in 5 women has been a victim of sexual assault while she was attending college. Most of the attempted or completed sexual assaults on college campuses are perpetrated by classmates, dates or acquaintances of the victim.

Freshman and sophomore women are thought to be at greatest risk of sexual assault.

“1 in 5 women has been a victim of sexual assault that occurred while she was attending college. By far, most of the attempted or completed sexual assaults on college campuses are perpetrated by classmates, dates or acquaintances of the victim.”

Experts say the ubiquity of alcohol, freedom from parental monitoring, and an atmosphere that celebrates macho and athletic bravado are all factors that foster sexual assaults.

… more

EIGE Gender Statistics Database – Violence

Online Discussion – EIGE Gender Statistics Database-Section on Violence  11/05/2015

Please note registrations end on 28/05/2015

If you are a registered member of  EuroGender, click on 28 May on EuroGender Calendar and Join the event.  If not, then click to register.

European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE) invites participation in online discussion “EIGE’s Gender Statistics Database – Section on Violence ” May 28th, 9.00 – 3.00pm CET/ 10 – 4pm EET

EIGE has developed and collected some gender statistics datasets, that are being consolidated into a unique database on gender statistics. Its visual solution is under finalisation and will be launch later this year.  The Gender Statistics Database section on violence raises several challenges due to limited data and an absence of harmonised concepts.  The project’s gender statistics  team invites statisticians, gender-based violence experts and all users of gender statistics to join the online discussion to explore solutions to overcome challenges raised. Specific questions raised in the event’s agenda will be published on EuroGender.

 

Name that wrinkle!

Why is ageism so prevalent?

….. maybe because it pays?

Ageism appears across the media and marketeers do not mind using this, no matter how it might annoy older people, women in particular, to make their products profitable and successful!

 

tumblr_mv5bm6t9C21s3eqbno1_wrinkles

The number of elderly is forecast to continue to rise will continue to rise over the period to 2050.  Will women continue to support the “glamour” and cosmetic industries while being portrayed as victims.

Many industries need to take on their responsibilities and become age positive or women will vote with their purses. Health is also about how you feel about yourself and living in a society that does not appear to be age friendly does not help!

Make products more age-positive blog help combat ageism and appreciate the aesthetics that accompany older age . …..more

I would like to thank Eurohealth for helping to highlight this issue and age positive blog for the information and images used in this post.

Ageism can affect the younger as well as the older.

Remember its:

Say no to Ageism Week is from June 4th to 8th June

A G Rumpie

ie: Future HRB strategy – consultation and feedback

The HealthResearch Board, Ireland (HRB) is developing a new strategic plan to direct their activity from 2016 to 2020.  They want to engage with people interested in future Irish health research with constructive feedback from stakeholders:

  • Testing provisional ideas ‘in the field’.
  • Identifing significant gaps, or potential errors, in their approach.

You can assist by reading their strategy consultation document which has a short background with proposed areas of focus for the HRB over next five years.

Please note that the closing date for this phase of consultation is Friday 22 May 2015.
.…more

Sex and Gender in Medical Education

Sex and Gender in Medical Education

European Gender Medicine (EUGENMED) WORKSHOP           |2015

This file can be downloaded as a PDF

Eugenmed Expert Workshop

This was held on 4 March 2015, at European Economic and Social Committee, Brussels, Belgium

The failure to acknowledge the impact of sex and gender (S&G) differences will affect the quality of health care provision, precisely what good medical education seeks to prevent. There must be a commitment to mainstream an evidence-based gender perspective throughout medical curriculum, including in graduate, medical, nursing, rehabilitation, pharmacy, continuing medical education and continuing nursing education programmes. This workshop examined how S&G consideration can be best integrated into medical education.

Co-Chairs

Dr. Katrín Fjeldsted, President, Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME), Iceland

Dr. Petra Verdonk, VU University Medical Centre, the Netherlands

Executive Summary

As part of the FP7-funded European Gender Medicine (EUGenMed) Project, the European Institute of Women’s Health (EIWH) organised a workshop on 4 March 2015, bringing together a multidisciplinary, multi-sectarian group of approximately fifty experts to discuss Sex and Gender in Medicines Regulation and Medical Education.

Peggy Maguire, Director General of the EIWH, opened the afternoon session and welcomed the expert participants. Dr. Katrín Fjeldsted of the Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME) and Dr.Petra Verdonk of the VU University Medical Centre co-hosted the afternoon session, which explored the integration of sex and gender in medical education.

People at Meeting

EIWH Board Member Prof. Karen Ritchie of INSERM, chaired a panel of speakers who outlined examples of best  practice for integrating sex and gender in medical education.

Dr. Petra Verdonk of the VU University Medical Centre presented the challenges of sex and gender mainstreaming in medical education based on her experience of integrating sex and gender issues in eight medical curricula in the Netherlands.

Prof. Dr. Margarethe Hochleitner of the Medical University Innsbruck detailed the successful
integration of sex and gender in different curricula at the Medical University, Innsbruck and gave
examples of best practice. Speakers from Charité—Universitätsmedizin presented their current efforts to integrate sex and gender in medical education.

Dr. Ute Seeland of the Institute of Gender Medicine at Charité—Universitätsmedizin spoke on the extension of sex and gender knowledge in medical education through their online e Gender educational programme. The next presentation was by Sabine Ludwig of Charité Universitätsmedizin who explored how Charité Berlin integrated sex and gender throughout their new modular medical curriculum.

The second panel explored how to move forward and the opportunities to integrate sex and gender in medical education. Prof. Dr. Hanneke de Haes of AMC-UvA explained how communication was successfully integrated into medical education and discussed how this practice could be applied to the integration of sex and gender in medical education.
Sex and Gender in Medical Education.

Sex and Gender in Medical Education

Kristina Mickeviciute of the European Medical Students Association spoke on the identification of enhancers and barriers for implementing sex and gender as part of the medical curriculum. The presentation also addressed the sex and gender gaps in medical students’ knowledge, expressing enthusiasm for student involvement in designing and implementing future reform efforts.  Dr.Katrín Fjeldsted of CPME discussed addressing the sex and gender gaps in medical professional knowledge through continuing medical education. Dr. Fjeldsted said,

“To ensure the effective implementation and application of  recommendations, medical doctors and medical students must be involved in all discussions on medical education.”

People at Sex and Gender in Medical Education 3

Prof. Dr. Harm Peters outlined the role of the Association of Medical Schools in Europe (AMSE) as the European forum for medical schools, promoting and developing the co- operation between medical schools. The workshop participants also heard how the Association of Medical Schools in Europe (AMSE) sets standard and ensures quality of activities in medical education, including outlining its commitment to advancing equity and social justice.  Dr. Janusz Janczukowicz of the International Association for Medical Education, (AMEE) presented on integrating and co-ordinating sex and gender into medical education cross- nationally and how medical education organisations can support and promote integration and co-ordination of sex and gender into medical education cross nationally across Europe. He outlined the AMEE activities including the guide on gender in medical education, which is currently written.

Following the speakers presentations, EIWH Board Member Sinead Hewson of The Dendrite Group facilitated a discussion with participants on next steps, how to move forward to take action following the event. Next steps were outlined and recommendations to be incorporated in the EUGenMed Roadmap were made collaboratively by delegates.

People at Sex and Gender in Medical Education

Concluding the session, Dr. Verdonk closed the workshop by saying that,

“There must be a commitment to mainstream an evidence based gender perspective throughout medical curriculum, including in graduate, medical, nursing, rehabilitation, pharmacy, continuing medical education and continuing nursing education programmes.”

Peggy Maguire, Director General of the European Institute of Women’s Health opened the workshop by welcoming the experts, stressing the importance of the session and introducing the co-chairs.

Panel A: Examples on How to Best Integrate S&G in Medical Education

 

Prof_Karen_Ritchie

 

 Chair: Prof. Karen Ritchie, Imperial College London, Director INSERM and   EIWH Board Member, France

 

 

 

Making a gender difference: Challenges of sex and gender mainstreaming in medical education

Dr._Petra_Verdonk

 

 Dr. Petra Verdonk, VU University Medical Centre, the Netherlands

 

 

 

 

Dr. Verdonk began by stating that curricula are accommodated to the interests of new groups due to pressure from social movements outside institutions. A Dutch national project to integrate gender-mainstreaming (GM) in all medical curricula started in 2002 and finished in 2005. GM is a long-term strategy that aims to eliminate gender bias in existing routines for which involvement of regular actors within the organisation is required.

In this presentation, some of the challenges of GM in medical education we met were discussed.
Steps taken in the national project included the evaluation of a local project, establishing a digital knowledge centre with education material, involving stakeholders and building political support within the schools and national bodies, screening education material and negotiating
recommendations with course organisers, and evaluating the project with education directors and change agents. Data are gathered from interviews and document analysis. Dr Verdonk went on to say that factors playing a role are distinguished at three levels:

1. Policy level, such as political support and widespread communication of this support;

2. Organisational level, such as a problem-based curricula and procedures for curriculum     development and evaluation, and;

3. faculty’s openness towards change in general and towards feminist influences in particular, and change agents’ position as well as personal and communicative skills.

Successful GM in medical education is both a matter of strategy as well as how such strategy is received in medical schools. She concluded her presentation by stating that a time-consuming strategy could overcome resistance as well as dilemmas inherent in GM. In addition, more female teachers than male teachers were openly accepting. However, women were situated in less visible and less powerful positions. Hence, GM is accelerated by alliances between women aiming for change and senior (male) faculty leadership. Recently, the curriculum at VUmc in Amsterdam was screened anew; a few words will be said about the new lessons learned.

Integrating sex and gender in different curricula at the Medical University Innsbruck
Prof._Dr_Margarethe_Hochleitner

 

 

 Prof. Dr. Margarethe Hochleitner, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria

 

 

 

Prof. Hochleitner began by asking the question—how does one integrate Gender Medicine into the curriculum? The goal is to integrate Gender Medicine into all human, dental and molecular medicine curricula of the Medical University of Innsbruck as a “regular” subject.

Gender Medicine is integrated as a compulsory course in the curricula for human, dental and molecular medicine at the Medical University of Austria, namely in the third semester (Fundamentals and Terminology of Gender Medicine) and the tenth semester (Clinical Relevance of Gender Medicine) and also in the compulsory examinations (SIP1 and SIP2). Moreover, Gender Medicine is a compulsory part of the Clinical PhD programme, three semesters and a final examination. After several years, Gender Medicine is fully integrated as a “regular” compulsory subject. Prof Hochleitner said that the University currently has approximately 200 diploma theses and about 25 PhD posters on Gender Medicine. Furthermore, Gender Medicine is fully integrated in physicians’ post-graduate training and since 2014, the Medical Association has issued a diploma in Gender Medicine. Finally, in Innsbruck University Gender Medicine is included in the training for all allied healthcare professions such as nursing and at the University of Applied Healthcare Sciences.

 

Extension of S&G knowledge in medical education–the concept of eGender

Dr.Med Ute Seeland photo

 

 Dr. Ute Seeland, Institute of Gender Medicine, Charité—Universitätsmedizin, Germany

 

 

 

Dr. Seeland said that research on medical education should inform our understanding of best learning strategies, teaching methods and assessment. Research on medical education with respect to sex and gender (S&G) aspects is rare. Some recommendations for S&G medical education curricula are available in a few countries. However, the systematic implementation of new knowledge fields all over Europe still remains a challenge. The gender community is becoming aware of the importance of evidence in S&G educational decision-making. Workshop participants followed the ideas presented with respect to the areas that should be developed in the medical education research field.

  • The first area should be systematic, organised communication between basic researchers and teachers, because evidence-based knowledge is essential ot medical expertise and high quality medical education.
  • The second area is the establishment of a European “Teacher-Pool” by performing a shared European teacher training. This approach is time- and cost effective, the best possibility to ensure a high standard of evidence-based teaching quality.
  • The third area of development should be research on how should we test the S & G  aspects/ content for a performance assessment.

The aim is to award a certificate attesting specific knowledge in gender medicine teaching that is recognised in all European countries.

Dr. Seeland recommended starting to close these gaps in S&G medical education the use and further development of the “e Gender” platform. This web-based platform is easily to access from everywhere in Europe and is based on a blended learning concept S&G knowledge is provided in eight medical disciplines. This platform is well suited to promote communication between basic researchers and teachers. These products can be assigned to the specific eGender “learning tools” provided at the eLearning courses. The eGender platform should be the communication and knowledge base for harmonising gender medicine education in Europe and help to integrate S&G aspects as a compulsory part in medical curricula. Funding is needed to support research in education, the development of pedagogical valuable teaching materials with the aim to develop and extend “eGender” to a European-wide E-learning system for education and networking.

Curricular integration of sex and gender aspects into the new modular medical curriculum at Charité Berlin

Sabine_Ludwig

 

 

 Ms. Sabine Ludwig, Charité—Universitätsmedizin, Germany

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ludwig began by explaining the background and methodology for the integration of
sex and gender aspects. A new modular outcome-based, interdisciplinary medical
curriculum was introduced at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin in 2010. The central
declared goal was to systematically integrate gender and sex aspects into the new medical
curriculum in order to guarantee that future doctors have adequate knowledge, practical
and communicative skills on gender differences as far as the development, diagnosis and
therapy of diseases is concerned to consider gender dimensions in their research.

A gender change agent was directly appointed into the curriculum development team to ensure direct interactions with the key players of the curricular change process of the faculty. The change agent implemented and followed a systematic approach. The basis was a wide-ranging research on potential sex and gender-related knowledge, skills and attitudes to be integrated in a specific, module themes.  During the faculty wide module planning process, the change agent constantly participated in the planning sessions, consulted with faculty members involved and assisted them in the formulation of gender learning objectives. With this approach, compulsory gender-related courses, gender-related knowledge/skills and gender-sensitive language were widely implemented throughout the curriculum in all teaching formats ranging from lectures and seminars to clinical skills courses, problem-based learning, communication training and students’ assessment and feedback.

A systematic approach and the appointment of a gender change agent can be key to successful integration of gender and sex aspects into a new medical curriculum. The change agent played a dual role. First, it identified sex and gender issues relevant to the curriculum, place them in the appropriate module session and provide counselling to module planners. Secondly, it built a network of stakeholders involved in the curricular planning process.

Panel B: Moving Forward—What are the Opportunities to Integrate Sex and Gender in Medical Education?

 

sinead_hewson

 

 Chair: Ms. Sinead Hewson, Managing Partner of the Dendrite Group and     

 EIWH  Board Member, the Netherlands

 

 

How communication was successfully integrated into Medical Education – can we use the same strategy for integrating sex and gender?

Prof._Dr_Hanneke_de_Haes,

 

 Prof. Dr. Hanneke de Haes, Department of Medical Psychology,  AMC-UvA,  Netherlands

 

 

 

Prof. De Haes said communication has been successfully implemented in many medical education curricula in Western Europe. One has to ask whether something could be learned from the communication experience given the barriers encountered to achieving the acceptance of gender issues.

  • First, contextual or political factors are helpful. Lay pressure was extremely important and influential as concerned citizens increasingly ask for input in the doctor patient relationship and treatment decisions. Legal obligations were installed and blueprints/guidelines in medical curricula were developed. These are most powerful when the leadership of organisations supports them. Also, translating communication criteria in obligatory programmes further enhances the students’ motivation to adopt communication teaching.
  • Secondly, if change is to be accepted, one must consider the motivation of the medical profession, particularly the importance of communication. Medical professional need to advance the health of patients in an effective and efficient manner. Thus, doctors’ value of gathering appropriate information, providing clear information, making good decisions and providing advice about disease and treatment related behaviour that is most likely to maximise patient outcomes. There must be a good relationship building and an empathic attitude by the doctor towards the patient. By making these goals concretely behavioural, clinicians can learn to be more effective in their daily consultation practice.
  • Thirdly, there is an important need to develop a perfect presentation at the centre of the medical training. This involves attracting the best teachers and providing the best didactic, visual design. The success of communication training in medical education, thus, has quite abstract as well as very concrete roots and has to be approached from a top down as well as a bottom up approach.

 

How can we address the sex and gender gaps in medical students’ knowledge?

Ms_Kristina_Mickeviciute

 

 Ms. Kristina Mickeviciute, European Medical Students Association, Lithuania

 

 

 

 

Ms. Mickeviciute explained to the participants that sex and gender differences have been proven to impact medical outcomes, so they should be incorporated into the training of doctors. She said that there are enhancers in integrating sex and gender into medical curricula:

1. the general interest because of the topic appeal;
2. the involvement of all stakeholders;
3. the use of tools, which would translate theory into practice.

However, there are also barriers:

1. the conservative nature of medicine;
2. resistance from regulatory perspective; and
3. financing.

She then detailed the role that medical students play in medical curricula development, such as identifying the gaps; evaluating medical curriculum; increasing awareness; advocacy for implementation; and involvement in policy making. Ms. Mickeviciute outlined the importance of involving medical students to address sex and gender gaps in education.

The Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME) represents national medical associations
across Europe. Dr. Fjeldsted said that doctors are committed to contributing the medical
profession’s point of view to EU and European policy-making through pro-active cooperation on
a wide range of health and healthcare related issues.

It is at the core of CPME’s mission to promote best possible quality healthcare for every patient
according to his or her needs. High quality patient care must, therefore, consider sex and gender
specific requirements. At the same time, CPME has a strongly policy stance on equal
opportunities, relating not only to the profession itself, but to health and healthcare as a whole.
As set out in the 2001 CPME Policy on Equal Opportunities, gender differences are one of the
dimensions in which discrimination cannot be tolerated.

She went on to say that to achieve high quality equitable healthcare, it is necessary to reflect awareness for sex and gender based patient needs in medical education and training, research, health technologies,medical ethics and the everyday patient-doctor relationship. CPME looks forward to the outcomes of the EUGenMed project and its recommendations on how to improve patient care for a healthier Europe.

How can we address the sex and gender gaps in medical professional knowledge through continuing medical education?

Dr Katrín_Fjeldsted

 

Dr. Katrín Fjeldsted, President, Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME), Iceland

 

 

 

The Standing Committee of European Doctors (CPME) represents national medical associations
across Europe. Dr. Fjeldsted said that doctors are committed to contributing the medical
profession’s point of view to EU and European policy-making through pro-active cooperation on
a wide range of health and healthcare related issues.

It is at the core of CPME’s mission to promote best possible quality healthcare for every patient
according to his or her needs. High quality patient care must, therefore, consider sex and gender
specific requirements. At the same time, CPME has a strongly policy stance on equal opportunities, relating not only to the profession itself, but to health and healthcare as a whole.
As set out in the 2001 CPME Policy on Equal Opportunities, gender differences are one of the
dimensions in which discrimination cannot be tolerated.

She went on to say that to achieve high quality equitable healthcare, it is necessary to reflect awareness for sex and gender based patient needs in medical education and training, research, health technologies, medical ethics and the everyday patient-doctor relationship. CPME looks forward to the outcomes of the EUGenMed project and its recommendations on how to improve patient care for a healthier Europe.

Association of Medical Schools in Europa (AMSE): Standard setting and quality assurance
Prof_Dr_Harm_Peters

 

Prof. Dr. Harm Peters, Association of Medical Schools in Europe (AMSE), Germany

 

 

 

 

Prof. Peters’ presentation provided an overview on the mission, vision, values and objectives
of the Association of Medical Schools in Europe (AMSE). AMSE´s major goal is to ensure and
enhance the quality and quality standards of medical education in Europe by serving as the
European forum for medical schools. AMSE closely works together with the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) and the Association of Medical Educators in Europe (AMEE). Advancing equity and social justice are among the key values of AMSE. Regarding Gender Medicine, AMSE is committed to lead innovation in medical education and to contribute to the setting of standards in medical education for good practice.

How can we integrate and co-ordinate sex and gender into medical education
cross-nationally across Europe?

Dr_Janusz_Janczukowicz

 

 Dr. Janusz Janczukowicz, AMEE—an International Association For Medical        Education, UK

 

 

 

 

Integrating and coordinating gender and sex-related elements into medical education
should go far beyond implementing education outcomes related to gender medicine. It
should embrace all domains of medical education, including gender inclusive assessment,
gender friendly programmes and a safe educational environment, together with the
appropriate faculty development programmes.

Dr. Janczukowicz stated that one of the key issues in implementing gender into medical
education is a correct understanding of all intersecting factors. The differences between
countries, cultures and local contexts include not only educational standards but first of all
knowledge and perception of gender equality with the resulting varied readiness to accept
change. Consecutively, both the starting point and the methods applied to implement
gender and sex into medical curricula should be carefully adjusted to local needs to avoid rejection at both individual (learner’s and teacher’s) and institutional levels. Identifying appropriate national and institutional change leaders should promote the collective approach with the consecutive long lasting results.

The International Association for Medical Education, AMEE, identifies diversity, and inclusiveness as the crucial factors in contemporary medical education. AMEE is currently working on the guide on Gender in Medical Education and is willing to develop co-operation with members forming the Special Interest Group in this area.

Towards a European S&G Roadmap: Recommendations


1.  Develop a policy paper on sex and gender in medical education. Generate accessible and inclusive publications.

2.  Set up a European stakeholder group on sex and gender in medical
education.

3.  Educate teachers on the importance of integrating sex and gender into
medical education. Encourage interactive education.

4.  Work with students to integrate sex and gender in medical education,
improving medical education. Adjust curricula to improve content,
focusing on well being.

5.  Improve communication of the importance of sex and gender in medical
education, expanding to a wide audience. Develop a clear definition of
“medical education.”

6.  Promote the diffusion of best practice of integrating sex and gender into
medical education using evidence to improve patient outcomes.

7.  Hold a symposium on sex and gender in medical education.

crowd5

EUGenMed Project
Project: http://eugenmed.eu
Twitter: @EUGenMed

Project Partners:

Institute of Gender in Medicine (GiM)
Charité University Berlin Hessische Straße 3-4, 10115
Berlin, Germany
http://gender.charite.de

European Institute of Women’s Health
33 Pearse Street
Dublin 2, Ireland
http://eurohealth.ie

Department of Health, Ethics and Society
Maastricht University
P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD
Maastricht, the Netherlands
http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/

7th EU funding ProgrammeThis project the European Gender Medicine Network (EUGenMed) has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No.602050.

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